MxMo LXIV : Tiki

February 20th, 2012 by Colonel Tiki

Is it Mixology Monday already again? I know it’s grapefruit season again. It’s a great beautiful season too. Here’s a little something tiki via Brazil: The Rio Tonga. Yes, the celery bitters are important.

Rio Tonga
1½ oz white grapefruit juice
½ oz unsweetened pineapple juice
¾ oz Allspice-Cinnamon-Vanilla infused rich simple1
1½ oz cachaça (I used Novo Fogo)
2 dashes angostura bitters
1 dash celery bitters
4 drops Herbsaint

Mix with 6 oz crushed ice in a top-down drinks mixer and pour into footed hurricane. Garnish lime twist.

 

  1. I use vanilla sugar with cracked allspice berries and shredded ceylon cinnamon. You can have just as good by using ½oz B.G.Reynolds Cinnamon Syrup and ¼ oz B.G.Reynolds Don’s Spices #2. []

Glisan Grog

August 4th, 2011 by Colonel Tiki

I was lucky enough to be asked to provide a local-flavor exotic cocktail recipe to celebrate the triumphant return of Trader Vic’s to Portland. When I say triumphant, it is an understatement. The partners who realized this vision deserve the heaps of admiration they are currently receiving.

I did not expect to speak to a partner who clearly understood and had great experience with what Trader Vics is.  To be of the highest praise: This is Trader Vic’s.

And so, how could I not make a coffee grog? I’ve been waxing about the deep body of coffee for some time now and will likely continue. The dandy combination of Coffee/Lime/Pineapple forms the core of the flavor profile. One may be surprised at the volume of Herbsaint – it should balance the fresh pineapple and the wine notes of a central american sourced coffee, so feel free to tweak at will.

Glisan Grog

2 oz dark Jamaican Rum1
¾ oz cold coffee2
¾ oz fresh pineapple juice3
½ oz B. G. Reynolds Vanilla Syrup
½ oz fresh lime juice
¼ oz Herbsaint4
2 dashes bitters

Shake all with 6 oz crushed ice5. Pour into a double rocks glass and garnish with spanked mint and a dusting of ground nutmeg.

  1. a mix of dark and aged Jamaican is also interesting []
  2. central american source []
  3. traditional variety, non-’gold’ []
  4. or less as to your taste and balance []
  5. for a better drink, use a top-down mixer []

Drinks of Strong Contrast

April 29th, 2011 by Colonel Tiki

Everyone has a flavor profile that they adore. As I’ve talked about before, the lion’s share of us tiki mixologist folk are non-tasters. This means that we love strong and complex flavors because our tongues are myopic1. Blair is a fan of heavy spice and strong citrus epitomized by the Nui Nui, for example. I do love that profile, but my heart is in drinks of high contrast.

Tenebrism

I’m talking about elevated high notes right next to deep base and dark tones, such as the profile you’ll find in my Dark Magic. In that particular recipe, the lime and pineapple are highly contrasted against the Jamaican rum and coffee syrup. This realization led me to delving into the idea of making a drink that really pushes this idea. The art history geek in me made the name. It’s Tiki, so I hope you’ll not be daunted by the ingredient list.

Tenebrist

1 oz Coruba Jamaican Rum
½ oz Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum
½ oz Cynar
1/8 oz Fernet Branca
¾ oz fresh white grapefruit juice
¾ oz fresh pineapple juice
½ oz Trader Tiki Cinnamon Syrup
dash aromatic bitters
8 drops herbsaint

Shake with crushed ice and serve in a double rocks glass, garnish with grapefruit peel and cinnamon stick

  1. If I can be allowed to mix metaphors []

Bum Rudder and Xmas savings

December 10th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

TDN : Winter Tiki Drinks

Over at the Mixoloseum Bar, you must know by now that we have weekly Thursday Drink Nights, right? This past Thursday’s theme was “Winter Tiki” and the unstoppable Jeff “Beachbum” Berry dropped by to guest-host for a stint. We had a blast.

Quixotica

I have recently re-kindled my love affair with Cynar. I like playing resinous spices against the deep botanicals – you’ll notice that the Poison Dart exposes this idea. What could add yet more holiday joy to that combo but Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum1 and hot milk, right? It’s ideas like this which force the name:

Quixotica
1 oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Cynar
¼ oz Pimento Dram
¼ oz Clove/Cinnamon syrup
dash bitters

Pour heated milk over other ingredients in a heat-proof glass or mug, dust with fresh nutmeg and garnish with cinnamon stick.

At that point, the talk went to Coconut Butter (and the problems finding a good product for drinks). I have some coconut butter myself, but have not as yet tried it as a cocktail ingredient. Wow. WOW. Yeah, I see a big future this winter season, all centered around coconut butter.2 The brand I use is “Artisana,” and it is a raw, whole-coconut product. It is amazing. Behold my quixotica creation — a coconut buttered rum that may well ruin you.

The Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder
1½ oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Falernum3
½ oz Don’s Spices #24
½ oz Cinnamon Syrup5
1 tsp Coconut Butter
4 oz hot Apple Cider (non spiced)6
dash bitters

Pour hot cider over other ingredients in a heat proof glass or mug. garnish with clove-pierced orange peel and cinnamon stick.

..and now the savings!

This Christmas, Trader Tiki is giving out a 15% savings when you spend $20 or more. That’s only about 2 bottles. You can get everything you need for these cocktails and more! When you get to checkout, use the discount code “ILUVBLOGZ.” Tell him the Colonel sent you!

With your newly purchased syrups, you can check out all the other Christikimas recipes that we came up with on the Mixoloseum’s Twitter Feed. Cheers!

  1. You must purchase this rum. Must. []
  2. sorry Paul! []
  3. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  4. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  5. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  6. I use an electric kettle to heat my cider, it is a cinch! []

Poison Dart

November 4th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

Poison Dart
½ oz orgeat
½ oz fresh squeezed lemon juice
¼ oz cinnamon syrup
¼ oz Cynar
2 oz Bulleit Bourbon
dash orange bitters
dash pimento dram

stir well and double strain into cocktail glass, orange twist garnish.

The spices in Amaros pair wonderfully in tropicals. Here, the rich complex Cynar is paired with cinnamon, lemon and orgeat to pull out those lovely spicy notes in Bulleit. You don’t need rum to make tiki!

Vendetta

November 4th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

Vendetta
¾ oz fresh squeezed orange juice1
¾ oz fresh squeezed lime juice
¼ oz vanilla syrup2
¼ oz pimento dram
1½ oz tequila blanco (I used Casa Noble)
dash aromatic bitters
8 drops herbsaint

Mix all with 6oz fine crushed ice in top-down drinks mixer; alternately blend with 6oz regular ice in 5-one second full pulses. Pour into footed goblet or double rocks, garnish with lime wheel.

I created this little number for Thursday Drink Night: Rumless Tiki. The Initial of the name and the straws in the picture (as well as the above recipe) should give away the famous drink on which it is based. Can you guess?

  1. Know your OJ! []
  2. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki Exotic Syrups []

The Dark Magic

October 15th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

The Dark Magic

My lovely wife has a weekly cocktail column over at alt.life. This week she chose to cover an original creation of mine: The Dark Magic.

This drink is inspired by The Mai-Kai’s Black Magic, but has evolved into its own animal. Here’s the recipe:

Dark Magic
1 oz fresh lime juice
½ oz unsweetened pineapple juice
½ oz Coffee Syrup1
¼ oz Passion Fruit Syrup2
¼ oz Vanilla Syrup3
2 oz Coruba Dark Jamaican Rum
1 dash Aromatic Bitters
8 drops (1/8th oz) Herbsaint

Blend ingredients with 8oz ice for 5 one-second pulses. Alternately, mix with crushed ice using top-down drinks mixer. Pour into 12oz hurricane glass.

  1. 1 part strong coffee, 2 parts sugar: bring almost to boil, remove from heat, bottle and store in fridge for up to 30 days []
  2. Colonel Tiki recommends Trader Tiki brand Cocktail Syrups []
  3. Colonel Tiki recommends Trader Tiki brand Cocktail Syrups []

TDN – Bols Genever: G.V.D. (godverdomme)

June 8th, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

Sometime ’round about 2002 a friend of mine returned from Amsterdam with a ceramic bottle of Corenwyn. Since then, I’ve been completely enamored with Corenwyn, genevers, and old-tom gins. Blair over on the Mixoloseum Blog can tell you more about Genever and such, I’ll just say it is delicious.

This past Thursday’s TDN was centered around Bols new launch of their Genever. It is a fabulous product. Right now it has limited availability and I look forward its expansion (and support from the OLCC, I hope). It has a mouth feel of velvet and a refined balanced flavor profile that ends in warm malty notes.

The strange late spring heat wave we’ve been having here in Portland directed me toward my concoction that I delivered to TDN. My friends Molly and Zorn (both PDX bartenders with decades of experience) introduced me to the wonder of chile peppers and fruit in cocktails. Greg Hoitsma over at Andina also has great success with Habañero and Passion Fruit (an amazing combination). I am particularly obsessed with the pineapple/lemon/simple/chile, featuring a good earthy chile such as a Jalapeño or a Serrano. For a Thai chile or birds-eye I think I might switch out the lemon for lime.

I’m very happy with the result from the below concoction. It is amongst the four finalists over at the Mixoloseum Blog. Please go over there to vote for it if you find it surpasses the competition, as I do. Also if you’re over there try out the “Malt Gasoline.” It’s a wonderful swizzle only slightly less of a winner than mine. ;)

G.V.D. (godverdamme)

Photo courtesy Tiare (www.amountainofcrushedice.com)

G.V.D (godverdomme)
2 oz Bols Genever
½ oz pineapple juice (fresh, please)
½ oz lemon juice
½ oz vanilla syrup (sub simple)
few pinapple chunks
3 slices jalapeño or serrano chile
dash aromatic bitters (fee’s old fashioned, angostura, &c.)

Muddle pinapple chunks, chile, and juices. Add remaning ingredients and shake with ice to mix and form head. Double strain into cocktail glass and garnish with lemon twist (or as Tiare has in her beautiful shot, pineapple wedge and chile).

MxMo February 2009 – Hard Drinks for Hard Times

February 16th, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

mxmologoThere’s no two ways about it. It’s a hard time out there in the workaday world. Whether you’ve been laid-off, had your hours cut, or taken a pay decrease there’s less of the green to go around. Those hard facts are the theme for this month’s Mixology Monday. My esteemed friend Matt Rowley is hosting the grand sioree over at his whiskey forge. Please add it to your RSS feed if it isn’t already: He’s a good man — and thorough.1

Sebastian
I’ve been absent for a bit on the blog an MxMo front lately. There is good and wonderful reason for this however: The birth of my first Son, Sebastian Milton Felix.2 I was tempted to “pull a doug” and post Sebastian as my “broaden your horizons.” Because believe me, my horizons now are broad and far.

Babies as they say, however, ain’t cheap. Even more the reason for a hard times drink. The fabulous wife was also hard-up for a tipple for nine months.3 Hard times all around. I have a panacea to cure all these ills: Home-made Southern Comfort. This recipe is the #3 or #4 version and finally ready for release into the wild. Sebastian has another 17 years and 10.5 months till he gets to say the same. My friend Martin gave me this recipe back in … 2004? Time – where does it go? During Tiki Kon II, while we were chatting in the kitchen Heather mentioned how she loved southern comfort while I complained about the artificial flavors. He said something along the lines of “Really? Make your own. Easiest thing: just add orange rind, a bit of juice and vanilla syrup to cheap bourbon. It’s delicious.

Along the way, I’ve picked up a few extra ingredients and methods and it is cheap and delicious. This batch was made during the summer especially for Heather when she was out of labor (don’t tell anyone I sneaked a flask of it into the hospital)4

Home Comfort & Soda

Home Comfort Liqueur ($11.60)
1 750ml bottle Old Crow ($8.95)
2 peaches ($1)
1 orange ($0.50)
¼ cup vanilla sugar ($0.30)
¼ cup orange blossom honey ($0.75)

Cut the peaches into chunks, zest the orange and reserve the juice. Add the peaches, zest and juice into a mason jar with the bourbon. Let this infuse for at least a week (or two). Strain and blend with the sugar and honey and let sit for at least a month in a cool dark place, shaking regularly. Strain again and enjoy (in a cocktail below?)

Home Comfort & Soda
2oz Home Comfort (recipe above)
4oz Lemon Lime soda
ice

build a la highball in whatever glass that’s clean

Stop on by and Heather might let you have a sip.5

  1. He’s a good man, Jeffrey — and thorough. []
  2. Yes, Sebastian M.F. Hermann for those playing the home game. []
  3. Ask her about it for a lark. []
  4. I love posting ‘secrets’ on publicly available media. []
  5. You’d better bring her a gift. []

MxMo November 2008 — Made From Scratch!

November 10th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

It’s been a while, dear readers. It’s been crazy around Mathom House here. There will be a little monkey joining us in January so we’ve been busy getting a nursery together and of course the new basement temporary tiki bar, the “Monkey Hut in Exile.” It’s been hard to keep up with posting – I have about 3 or 4 posts in the queue. When I get more than about 30 minutes to myself, I’ll hope to put ‘em up.

This month, Doug at The Pegu Blog is hosting and the theme is “Made from Scratch!

While this must be the easiest MxMo to date for us Tiki cocktailians, it does offer the opportunity to make something new. I’m always making something in the kitchen: falernum, pimento dram, orgeat, forbidden fruits liqueur, orange curacao, bumbo, &c.

Hiram Walker was nice enough to provide some samples of their holiday line of liqueurs for sampling. I received them and I really can’t say much about them here and now. I was, however, moved to try my hand at making my own pumpkin liqueur. About two years ago I made a few batches of pumpkin syrup that were a hit. I wondered if my skills learned in the past year with infused liqueurs would yield something at least better than I could find on the shelf. The first version surpassed my expectations but needed a little tweaking to get the pumpkin flavor better represented. Here is the second version:

Pumpkin Liqueur

Pumpkin Liqueur ( this recipe makes over half a gallon, split accordingly)
2 Cups pumpkin, chunked and roasted
½ Cup ginger, sliced
½ Cup allspice berries, crushed
¼ Cup cloves, crushed
1 Nutmeg, ground
4 Sticks ceylon cinnamon, broken into pieces
1 Tbsp cassia cinnamon, ground
1 Tbsp mace, ground
2 pods vanilla, scraped
750ml LemonHart 151
8 cups sugar for syrup

Separate all spices and pumpkin into 2 equal parts. Infuse spices and pumpkin in 151 for at least one week. Combine the balance of the spices and pumpkin with the sugar and 4 cups of water. Bring to near boil and simmer for 30 minutes and pour into separate container for at least one week. After 1 week strain all solids from 151 infusion and syrup and combine. You can pour through a brita filter device, but I wait for the tiny solids to settle and I cart off the clear top liqueur.

I made this liqueur for a party benefiting the Portland Women’s Crisis Line. I featured it in a few cocktails. Here’s one of ‘em:

Harvest Old Fashioned
1 oz Pumpkin Liqueur
2 oz bourbon
Cherry and Orange wheel, muddled
Dash Fees bros bitters

Muddle fruit in mixing glass. Add ice, liquors, bitters and stir. Pour into rocks glass.

Yes, I not only include but also muddle the fruit in an old fashioned. It’s not an old fashioned old fashioned. Here is another just for MxMo:

Hot Rummin' Pumpkin

Hot Rummin’ Pumpkin
¾ oz Pumpkin Liqueur
¾ oz Jamaican dark rum
1½ oz demerara rum
4 oz cream, steaming hot
nutmeg, ground

Combine all ingredients in heated glass and top with ground nutmeg. Garnish with cinnamon stick.

Another month and another MxMo. Next month, I’ll be hosting so I’ll see everyone on the flipside for December’s MxMo – “Spice.”