MxMo LXIV : Tiki

February 20th, 2012 by Colonel Tiki

Is it Mixology Monday already again? I know it’s grapefruit season again. It’s a great beautiful season too. Here’s a little something tiki via Brazil: The Rio Tonga. Yes, the celery bitters are important.

Rio Tonga
1½ oz white grapefruit juice
½ oz unsweetened pineapple juice
¾ oz Allspice-Cinnamon-Vanilla infused rich simple1
1½ oz cachaça (I used Novo Fogo)
2 dashes angostura bitters
1 dash celery bitters
4 drops Herbsaint

Mix with 6 oz crushed ice in a top-down drinks mixer and pour into footed hurricane. Garnish lime twist.

 

  1. I use vanilla sugar with cracked allspice berries and shredded ceylon cinnamon. You can have just as good by using ½oz B.G.Reynolds Cinnamon Syrup and ¼ oz B.G.Reynolds Don’s Spices #2. []

Bum Rudder and Xmas savings

December 10th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

TDN : Winter Tiki Drinks

Over at the Mixoloseum Bar, you must know by now that we have weekly Thursday Drink Nights, right? This past Thursday’s theme was “Winter Tiki” and the unstoppable Jeff “Beachbum” Berry dropped by to guest-host for a stint. We had a blast.

Quixotica

I have recently re-kindled my love affair with Cynar. I like playing resinous spices against the deep botanicals – you’ll notice that the Poison Dart exposes this idea. What could add yet more holiday joy to that combo but Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum1 and hot milk, right? It’s ideas like this which force the name:

Quixotica
1 oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Cynar
¼ oz Pimento Dram
¼ oz Clove/Cinnamon syrup
dash bitters

Pour heated milk over other ingredients in a heat-proof glass or mug, dust with fresh nutmeg and garnish with cinnamon stick.

At that point, the talk went to Coconut Butter (and the problems finding a good product for drinks). I have some coconut butter myself, but have not as yet tried it as a cocktail ingredient. Wow. WOW. Yeah, I see a big future this winter season, all centered around coconut butter.2 The brand I use is “Artisana,” and it is a raw, whole-coconut product. It is amazing. Behold my quixotica creation — a coconut buttered rum that may well ruin you.

The Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder
1½ oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Falernum3
½ oz Don’s Spices #24
½ oz Cinnamon Syrup5
1 tsp Coconut Butter
4 oz hot Apple Cider (non spiced)6
dash bitters

Pour hot cider over other ingredients in a heat proof glass or mug. garnish with clove-pierced orange peel and cinnamon stick.

..and now the savings!

This Christmas, Trader Tiki is giving out a 15% savings when you spend $20 or more. That’s only about 2 bottles. You can get everything you need for these cocktails and more! When you get to checkout, use the discount code “ILUVBLOGZ.” Tell him the Colonel sent you!

With your newly purchased syrups, you can check out all the other Christikimas recipes that we came up with on the Mixoloseum’s Twitter Feed. Cheers!

  1. You must purchase this rum. Must. []
  2. sorry Paul! []
  3. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  4. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  5. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  6. I use an electric kettle to heat my cider, it is a cinch! []

Gantt’s Caipirissima

September 21st, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

This week I was happily awarded runner-up status on one of the drinks I submitted to Forbidden Island‘s cocktail competition. The competition was open to Tiki Central members as well as recipients of Forbidden Island’s newsletter.

I along with the other winners will be on Forbidden Island‘s Fall specials menu. I’ll be enjoying having someone other than myself make it when the Mrs. and I attend Tiki Central‘s eighth annual Tiki Crawl, the crawl that started it all.

If however you are far from Alameda or Portland, I share the recipe with you below. I hope you enjoy it as much as I.

Gannt's Caipirissima

Gantt’s Caipirissima
¼ Grapefruit, cut into 3 or 4 pieces (White grapefruit if seasonally possible)
1 oz Cinnamon Syrup (or 2 Tbs Cinnamon Sugar)
2 oz rhum agricole (Clément VSOP preferred)

Muddle grapefruit and cinnamon syrup in a double old fashioned glass. Add 4oz of crushed ice and rhum. Stir to mix and garnish with cinnamon stick.

I name it thus because I’ve long noted the similarties in vegetal flavors (and methods) between cachaça and rhum agricole. Donn Beach had a warm spot for cinnamon and grapefruit — and with good reason: They love each other. Donn also liked the martinique paired with his Mix (Donn’s mix, 2:1 grapefruit juice to cinnamon syrup), so I thought all these separate points of information needed to come together in a cocktail. I name it a Caipirissima (a Caipirinha with rum instead of cachaça) because I’m pedantic. Rhum agricole may be simmilar to Cachaça, but not enough to pretend it warrants the position under the caipirinha umbrella.

Flavor profiles: Falernum #4, phase II

April 16th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Finishing the Falernum

After more than three days of infusing the prior ingredients, it was time to strain, press, and complete Falernum #4.

Finishing the Falernum

Falernum #4 ingredients, cont.
3 cups simple syrup
1½ cups fresh lime juice

More »

Flavor profiles: Falernum #4, phase I

April 10th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

It’s time again to make another batch of falernum. This makes my fourth batch to date. I am still tinkering with my own recipe, based upon the wonderful Paul Clarke.

At Tiki Central I run into those who seem to be afraid to experiment in creating their own concoctions of tinctures, liqueurs and juices. There’s no need to dread or disdain working in the kitchen. If you can make an omelet, you can make falernum. There is not a time commitment needed: I spent a scant 25 minutes from start to finish below, and I was taking pictures.

Falernum Mise en Place

Falernum #4
9 limes, zest from
¼ cup diced fresh ginger
45 cloves
2 cardamom pods
½ cup slivered almonds, dry-roasted
750ml Cruzan 120 Clipper Rum

A picture essay follows after the cut. I hope this inspires the previously kitchen-adverse to start tinkering.
More »

The Results are in! (plus site re-theme)

January 7th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Simple Syrup Science has completed. The results are in! Noel was kind enough to be the last test subject for this round.

To summarize, I produced two 2:1 simple syrups. One was created by nothing more than shaking in a mason jar, the other was heated to boil, then removed from heat.
A tale of two syrups
I did a double blind test, 2 samples of each syrup type in random order.
Less talk, more science.

The main result is that while there is a perceptible difference, but not in the flavor. 66% of the test subjects could not taste a flavor difference. 66 % of the test subjects were able to tell one syrup from the other, but were wrong on which was which. What is the difference?

Viscosity. The hot method syrup was thicker than the cold method. One of the test subjects believed the thickness of the syrup affected the physicality of tasting, and so thought the hot-method syrup was less sweet than the cold-method. Results are a bit inconclusive, so I’d love to see this experiment repeated.

The next test will be tasting difference in falernum: Initial non-scientific non-blind tastings showed no difference between the two syrups in the falernum. I plan to test using the syrups in a cocktail as well.
Battle of the Falernums

But the take home? Don’t waste your time shaking the sugar (unless you are after a thinner mouth-feel for your syrup).

Also, I finished my initial design for the site. If you’ve never been there and only viewed via RSS feed, take a look and tell me what you think. If you’ve been to the site before, you may have to refresh your cache by force-reloading the page.

Cheers!

-=C

Post Holiday Humdrums

December 31st, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

It’s so hard to be back at a day job after holiday festivities.

The simple syrup project already has some results: The hot and cold process syrups have been created. The volume and hue turned out exactly the same, no need for adjusting. Last night Heather and I blind tasted them and recorded our results. I’m not going to report just yet, as we have a few more local tasters who will be testing; I wouldn’t want to skew their results with any early reports.

The Holiday was lovely, with much drinking and mixing going on. There were Tom & Jerrys, Navy Grogs, 3 Dots & a Dashes, Nui Nuis, Corspe Revivers #2, Manhattans, Mah Jonngs, Cesar Rum Punches, Flippin’ Flips, and plenty of highballs to go around. I also treated our merry gathering with 2 growlers of Bridgeport’s Ebeneezer Ale, hand-pulled and cask conditioned.

We were also productive with tinctures and infusions: We made a Creme de Menthe with our house-grown peppermint, Falernum and Pimento Dram, Pomegranate Liqueur, & my most anticipated — Orange Curaçao.

Blair was nice enough to bring over some of his home-made goodies: Rum Shrub, Orgeat, Ginger Beer, Cola Tonic & Taboo Liqueur.

Cigars were smoked, video games played (guitars make heroes), merriment and good cheer abounded.

Sure makes being here now that much worse in contrast. Ah, but tonight shall see more celebration.

Happy New Year everybody!

Science! Draft experiment plan for simple syrup production

December 19th, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

Does heat change the flavor of a simple syrup? Or, is there a difference or preference between cold-process and hot-process simple syrup?

I’d expect heat to alter the flavor of complex ingredients like fruit juice (another experiment perhaps). That is, I would not make grenadine by heating my pomegranate juice, I add simple to concentrated juice (which hopefully was concentrated through evaporation). But does heat significantly change the flavor of the base syrup? It is my hypothesis that the method has no significance to the flavor of the product. Below is the draft of my experiment plan. Please comment and criticize. My goal is to produce an experiment that my be reproduced for any peer analysis that others may wish to take part in.

Experiment setup:

Cold process: 2 cups of sugar and 1 cup of water are added to a mason jar. Lid is applied and mason jar is occasionally agitated until sugar completely dissolves. If any solids are left after 24 hours, they are filtered out, dried and measured. Volume is measured.

Hot process: 2 cups of sugar (minus mass equal to any undissolved solute of cold process) and 1 cup of water is added to saucepan. Mixture is brought to gentle boil and removed from heat. Mixture is cooled to room temperature and volume is measured. Enough water is added to equal volume of Cold process (to replace water lost through boiling).

Person alpha transfers mixtures into jars, marks them with ‘A’ and ‘B’ and places into refrigerator. Only person alpha knows the identities of ‘A’ and ‘B’.

Experiment Execution:

Person beta removes mixtures from refrigerator after 24 hours and secretly dispences into shot glasses/cups labeled 1,2,3 and 4. 2 cups will contain mixture ‘A’ and 2 will contain mixture “B.” Only person beta knows which mixture is in each numbered cup/glass. This is done for as many test subjects that will be taking part.

Test subjects record experiences and try to match sets (i.e. 1&3, 2&4 — I preferred 1&3, the mouth feel was better).

Test recordings are collected by person beta and correlated to ‘A’ and ‘B’. Person alpha reveals identities of cold and heat-processed syrups.