Bum Rudder and Xmas savings

December 10th, 2010 by Colonel Tiki

TDN : Winter Tiki Drinks

Over at the Mixoloseum Bar, you must know by now that we have weekly Thursday Drink Nights, right? This past Thursday’s theme was “Winter Tiki” and the unstoppable Jeff “Beachbum” Berry dropped by to guest-host for a stint. We had a blast.

Quixotica

I have recently re-kindled my love affair with Cynar. I like playing resinous spices against the deep botanicals – you’ll notice that the Poison Dart exposes this idea. What could add yet more holiday joy to that combo but Smith & Cross Jamaican Rum1 and hot milk, right? It’s ideas like this which force the name:

Quixotica
1 oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Cynar
¼ oz Pimento Dram
¼ oz Clove/Cinnamon syrup
dash bitters

Pour heated milk over other ingredients in a heat-proof glass or mug, dust with fresh nutmeg and garnish with cinnamon stick.

At that point, the talk went to Coconut Butter (and the problems finding a good product for drinks). I have some coconut butter myself, but have not as yet tried it as a cocktail ingredient. Wow. WOW. Yeah, I see a big future this winter season, all centered around coconut butter.2 The brand I use is “Artisana,” and it is a raw, whole-coconut product. It is amazing. Behold my quixotica creation — a coconut buttered rum that may well ruin you.

The Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder

Bum Rudder
1½ oz Smith & Cross dark Jamaican rum
½ oz Falernum3
½ oz Don’s Spices #24
½ oz Cinnamon Syrup5
1 tsp Coconut Butter
4 oz hot Apple Cider (non spiced)6
dash bitters

Pour hot cider over other ingredients in a heat proof glass or mug. garnish with clove-pierced orange peel and cinnamon stick.

..and now the savings!

This Christmas, Trader Tiki is giving out a 15% savings when you spend $20 or more. That’s only about 2 bottles. You can get everything you need for these cocktails and more! When you get to checkout, use the discount code “ILUVBLOGZ.” Tell him the Colonel sent you!

With your newly purchased syrups, you can check out all the other Christikimas recipes that we came up with on the Mixoloseum’s Twitter Feed. Cheers!

  1. You must purchase this rum. Must. []
  2. sorry Paul! []
  3. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  4. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  5. Colonel Tiki uses Trader Tiki brand syrups []
  6. I use an electric kettle to heat my cider, it is a cinch! []

Mixology Monday December 2008 – Spice

December 15th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

What did I get myself into? This month’s Mixology Monday’s Theme is Spice – picked by yours truly, hosted by yours truly. You’d think that if I pick and host that I should be pre-prepared, right? Nope. Here I am at 8pm writing up my own entry.

I would recommend having a perfect wife as I do. It makes things far easier. Also, try to get a Medieval History major if you can. There are a great deal of interesting ties to medieval cuisine in modern cocktailia. Orgeat comes out of the medieval use of Almond milk to better store fat in nut form to prevent spoilage: Just grind the nuts, and form some emulsion to get the nut fat and you can cook or bake with it. Orgeat is also tied to Barley-water which follows a similar method of extraction to nourish.

In a secret project she’s working on, I’ve pulled out the existence of a spice mix popularly used called “Powder Forte,” or Strong Powder. There was also a “Powder Dulce,” sweet powder. Powder Fort was used with meats and pies and other places where hot/strong flavors are desired. Western Medieval cuisine was what we would connect with savoury today – the French would put a stop to the idea that spices such as ginger, nutmeg, and cloves go with meats in the 1600s.

Powder Fort Mise en Place

The recipes for powder fort vary depending on which text you read, so my approximation is just that – the general ingredients are: Pepper(s), ginger(s), cloves(s), nutmeg(s), cinnamon(s), and grains of paradise. My only lost ingredient I’m still searching for is Long Pepper. Our current Pepper is the individual dried berries of piper nigra, but contemporary medieval cooks would be more familiar with piper longum – a family member that has smaller berries that are dried completly on the catkin, hence the term Long pepper. I have not as of yet been able to been locate a source. (I’d appreciate any help out there in the internets!). Stories say that a certain Spanish King owned orchards of piper nigrum and therefor forbid long pepper so he could push his form of pepper and so now we all know it as pepper, rather than the former more popular long pepper.

I thought I would first make a syrup to play with the mixure to get a hold on the flavor before further experimentation. Some recipes call for a 7-1 cinnamon/pepper/ginger – nutmeg/mace/grains/cloves, others 3-1. I decided to start with 4-1.

My recipe is as follows

Black Pepper 4 tsp. Black Pepper (sub for Long Pepper)

Galangal 1/4 Cup Galangal, diced.

Ginger 1/4 Cup Ginger, diced.

Cassia 2 tsp. ground Cassia

Cinnamon 2 tsp. (2 sticks) ground Cinnamon

Ceubeb 1 tsp. Cuebeb (tailed pepper)

Nutmeg 1/2 tsp ground Nutmeg

Mace 1/2 tsp. ground Mace

Cloves 1 tsp ground Cloves

Grains of Paradise 1 tsp. ground Grains of Paradise

Syrup cookin'Mix with 4 cups sugar, add 3 cups water and slowly bring to a boil. Simmer on low for 30 minutes. Let stand for at least 4 hours and strain.

The finished flavor was amazingly balanced for the number of ingredients. The finish is clean, the shape round and gorgeous. After tasting it Heather immediately thought of Gin. I agreed. She suggested a gin milk punch, since she finds it usually one-note or weak. I again agreed. She’s usually right (damn her.)

P1030622

Melcan Cwicbeam
¾ oz Powder Forte Syrup
2 oz Plymouth Gin
3 oz Milk (Almond milk would also do)

Shake all with cube ice and strain into footed huricane or brandy snifter. Grate nutmeg on top, cinnmaon stick garnish.

The name is a bit anacronistic, being Old English rather than Middle English, but you know – screw the damn Normans. Filthy beggars. The drink itself is anachronistic anyway – distilled liquor comes late to the medieval period, first as elixirs in monasteries, let’s pretend, shall we?

Next I’ll plan to make a Liqueur from the mix, perhaps also a bitters – I’m really in love with this spice mix. I’m definitely in love with Grains of Paradise.

I’ll have the wrap-up posted by tomorrow night, thanks to everyone who particiapted. Happy Holidays, Merry Christmas, Joyous Yule, Happy Hannukah, Happy Solstice, Joyous Saturnalia, Happy Kwanzaa, and Adequate Festivas to you and yours!

Gruß vom Krampus series, card II

December 3rd, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Ponder this – other than getting coal for Christmas1, Santa Claus just isn’t that scary. I know we all love to browse through the annual re-posting of the kids disturbed by the Jolly Old Elf, but he just doesn’t instill a palpable sense of dread2.

You’d better watch out, You’d better not cry
You’d better not pout, I’m telling you why:
Santa Claus is coming to town.

That’s really not much of a threat. I think this factor leads to my love for the dual nature of the European old (St.) Nick. The Devil coming to get you with his switch and horns and chains and claws? Yes, that the stuff. That should definitely inspire more nightmares than a lump of old coal.

Consider that nugget in the card below, where we get a close approximation to Coots’s and Gillespie’s lyrics above:

312985

Sei nur brav und niemals keck
Dann der Krampus schaut um’s eck

Be only well-behaved and never saucy,
(for) the Krampus is looking around the corner.

He sees you when you’re sleeping. He knows when you’re awake. Gruß vom Krampus!

And Yes, I know – another post with no cocktails. Hey, this is the “indigo firmaments” part of the blog and it has been ingored a bit as of late. I do promise that by the end of the week I’ll have a new cocktail for you all: The Krampus Swizzle. 5 points for the first person to get the connection.

  1. who gets coal anymore? anyone still use Christmas to punish misbehaving kids in contemporary culture? []
  2. other than the aspect of reduced gift volume []

Gruß vom Krampus

November 17th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Every December Heather and I throw a Christmas cocktail party centered around the germanic tradition of The Krampus. Krampus is a devil figure who accompanies Saint Nicholas. While old St. Nick gives nuts, fruit and candies for the good little boys and girls, the Krampus doles out punishment for the bad girls and boys: A piece of coal for their black little hearts, a beating with a black birtch switchel, or perhaps he’ll dump you in the river. He might even steal you away and take you back to Hell with him.

The same cultural role of the Krampus can be seen in other Christmas-time heavy homologues such as Black Peter, Pelznickel & Knecht Ruprect. Here in the New World, he has diminished and multiplied into Santa’s helper elves. A shame.

There are a wonderful collection of German post cards that feature the Krampus – often warning the sender and recipient from evil and sinful behavior. Gruß vom Krampus (Greetins from the Krampus) reminds everyone that the all-knowing devil sees you when you’re sleeping.

I’ll eventually get to some cocktail recipies centered around the Krampus in the weeks to come but until then I will feature a series of these vintage post cards. Where I can, I will translate.

Here is the first:
KrampusChain18-9-6638

Gruß vom Krampus!

Warst nicht brav,
drum hoppla-hopp,
Kommt das Krampus
im Galopp.

Greetings from the Krampus!

If you were not well behaved
by hopping to it,1
Krampus will come
a-galloping.

This year Krampus Nacht2 is on Saturday 6th December with another night on Sunday 7th December for Service Industry friends who are busy pouring Saturday Nights.

Gruß vom Krampus!

  1. Hoppla-Hopp is an idom that translates roughly to “on the double, or hop to it!” []
  2. The Fifth(!!) annual []

Post Holiday Humdrums

December 31st, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

It’s so hard to be back at a day job after holiday festivities.

The simple syrup project already has some results: The hot and cold process syrups have been created. The volume and hue turned out exactly the same, no need for adjusting. Last night Heather and I blind tasted them and recorded our results. I’m not going to report just yet, as we have a few more local tasters who will be testing; I wouldn’t want to skew their results with any early reports.

The Holiday was lovely, with much drinking and mixing going on. There were Tom & Jerrys, Navy Grogs, 3 Dots & a Dashes, Nui Nuis, Corspe Revivers #2, Manhattans, Mah Jonngs, Cesar Rum Punches, Flippin’ Flips, and plenty of highballs to go around. I also treated our merry gathering with 2 growlers of Bridgeport’s Ebeneezer Ale, hand-pulled and cask conditioned.

We were also productive with tinctures and infusions: We made a Creme de Menthe with our house-grown peppermint, Falernum and Pimento Dram, Pomegranate Liqueur, & my most anticipated — Orange Curaçao.

Blair was nice enough to bring over some of his home-made goodies: Rum Shrub, Orgeat, Ginger Beer, Cola Tonic & Taboo Liqueur.

Cigars were smoked, video games played (guitars make heroes), merriment and good cheer abounded.

Sure makes being here now that much worse in contrast. Ah, but tonight shall see more celebration.

Happy New Year everybody!

Mixology Monday December 2007 — Repeal Day

December 3rd, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

Mixology Monday - ProhibitionDecember 5, 1933: The twenty-first amendment is ratified and the failed experiment of Prohibition of Alcohol in the United States of America ends. Jeffery Morgenthaler has been trumpeting the recognition of Repeal Day as a damn fine Domestic holiday for years.

This Mixology Monday’s theme is Prohibition hosted by the man himself. My submission is below, based on the prohibition-contemporary cocktail “Everybody’s Irish.” Irish expatriates who brought their knowledge of distillery with them to the Americas soon were making their own Whisk(e)y. When Prohibition hit, domestic distillers of American Rye and Bourbon stopped (officially) producing whiskey. However, Canada was still producing. Though the Canadian Whisky is Scottish in origin, we’ll just ignore that bit (since Scots are Irish anyway who moved to the north of the English Island, displacing the Picts). I thought a fun change of the “Everybody’s Irish” cocktail would be to honor their ingenuity with domestic sources and use a likelier ingredient of prohibition: Canadian Whisk(e)y.

I’ve loved Chartreuse since first tasting it when my friend David from Oak Hall, Virginia brought a bottle when he visited us in the early 00′s. It wasn’t until earlier this year when I had a Last Word at Zig Zag Cafe in Seattle that I considered it for mixing. I’d loved the idea of the Irish cocktails in Classic Cocktails of the Prohibition Era but until Mur the blur poured that Last Word, I’d not braved it. I’ve since made up for it.

The drink is delicious and would likely work with any Whisk(e)y you have about. I’ve tried Rye & Canadian so far. The olive (while questionable at first) is a nice contrast to help you taste the contribution of the Creme de Menthe and the Chartreuse. Also, the Green and Red of the drink and olive remind you December is Christmastime. Enjoy!

Everybodys Irish American

Everybody’s Irish American

1 tablespoon Green Chartreuse
1 tablespoon Green Creme de Menthe
2 oz. Canadian Whisky

Stir with ice and strain into 3 oz cocktail glass. Garnish with olive speared on a cocktail pick.

-=C

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas … Drinks.

November 28th, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

Ho, Ho Ho! The Snowball is showing up everywhere you go!

Trader Tiki stopped by a few weeks ago and we plowed our way through 2 Christmas bowl drinks, so the Christmas Cocktail Project continues:

English Bishop

English Bishop

2 oranges
Whole Cloves
2 Ceylon Cinnamon Sticks
Brown Sugar
375ml Coruba or other Dark rum
32 oz Unfiltered Apple Juice Nutmeg

P1000106Pierce Oranges with toothpick and insert cloves. Wet oranges and roll in brown sugar to coat. Place oranges in baking dish and roast in a 350° oven until they brown slightly. In a saucepan, add cinnamon sticks (broken) to dark rum and warm. Remove oranges, cut into wedges and add to heat-safe ceramic bowl (large enough for 1 gallon of liquid). Add ½ cup Brown sugar and muddle together with oranges. When Rum begins to vaporize, add rum and cinnamon to orange-sugar mixture. Take the bowl to a fire-safe location and set on fire. At your discretion, put out the fire by pouring in the apple cider. Serve warm in footed glass mugs, dust top with fresh grated nutmeg.

Blair spurred me to make this recipe. I cobbled it together from Jerry Thomas’s book and other online sources. The Smell of this one was amazing: The quick-made Pomanders roasting in the oven produced a gorgeous scent that filled the whole house with Christmas. Setting it on fire was a blast as well.

Feuerzangebowle

Feuerzangenbowle

1 Orange
1 Lemon
1 Bottle Red Table Wine
10 Whole Cloves
10 Allspice Berries
5 Cardamom Pods
2 Ceylon Cinnamon Sticks
375ml Coruba or other Dark Rum
1 Sugar Hat (Zukerhut)

FeuerzangebowleUsing a Channel knife, zest/carve orange and lime into Crockpot on low. Cut Orange and Lemon in wedges and add to pot. Add wine and spices. Let this mixture mull for at least 30 minutes. Before serving, warm rum in saucepan. place tongs on bowl and set sugar hat on tongs. Soak sugar hat with warmed rum and set alight. With a long-handled metal ladle (in a fire-safe location), pour remaining rum over burning sugar to melt into bowl. When the rum and sugar have been added to the bowl, put out the fire and stir. Serve warm in glass footed mugs.

Feuerzangebowle will feature prominently around our annual Christmas Party, which is themed on the peculiar Germanic Christmas icon “Der Krampus.” It’s called “Gruss vom Krampus” and this is the fourth annual celebration. If you’re in the Portland area the weekend of December 7-9th, drop me a line and I’ll shoot you an evite.

-=C

Cassia vs. Cinnamon and Donn the Beachcomber

November 6th, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

At some point, in North America (at least the U.S.A. and Canada), Cinnamon was replaced by its much less expensive cousin, Cassia. The taste, while similar enough for many uses, is definitely noninterchangeable for most cocktail recipes. The trick is to know which to use and when to use it.

Cassia
Cassia (Cinnamomum Cassia) is thick and red-brown in color and is what you’ll most likely get when you purchase cinnamon in a regular grocery store. The flavor is strong, sharp and hot. It is a perfect choice for baking or where you only want to taste only Cinnamon. However, it will quickly overpower any balanced drink when you use it in syrup (or purchase Cinnamon syrup made with Cassia).

Ceylon

Ceylon or ‘true’ Cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) is light brown and has the consistency of paper. It will easily give and break apart in your hand. The flavor has essences of citrus and is mellow, warm. It shines in chocolate, mulling, and especially in your mixed drinks. This is the Cinnamon you’ll want for making or purchasing syrup. You can find it cheaper in the Mexican food section of your market labeled as “Canela.” I get mine from Penzey’s.

When making the Donga Punch from Sippin’ Safari, I decided to perform an experiment. I mixed one drink using the Cassia syrup, and the other with Ceylon Cinnamon. The Cassia version tasted exceedingly of the sharp, spicy notes I love in a Cinnamon roll. The drink, however, was unbalanced. I did manage to finish it. The Donga containing Ceylon Cinnamon was properly balanced and delicious. The Ceylon supported the flavor profile, enhanced the rum, and contrasted nicely with the Grapefruit. In the other version, the grapefruit flavor was lost to the overbearing zing of Cassia.

Further experiments at Blair’s Galley with the Nui Nui bore the same results. Donn drinks seem to call for Ceylon Cinnamon, not Cassia. It makes me wonder: Did Cassia replace Cinnamon in common domestic use after the creation of these classic Tiki drinks? Did Ray Buhen and Donn’s other boys use only true Cinnamon, coming from a cuisine and culture that did not conflate the two? Bears research I say.

Not to say that Cassia has no role in drink making. I still add it (very carefully) to hot rum batter (with as much care as I would cloves, the other flavor killer in high doses), Coffee Grog (not the batter, pinch-wise while making the drink), and for light toppings of other hot drinks when I think the recipe calls for a light smack of the ‘heavy stuff.’

I’m just happy I’ve made a discovery that has improved my mixology, and I hope I pass it on to you and yours.

Cheers!

-=C

Xmas Drink #1: The Snowball

October 2nd, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

The Snowball is a highball of Advocaat and lemon-lime soda, sometimes with a splash of lemon and/or lime juice.

Snowball

1½ oz. Advocaat
3 oz. Lemon-Lime soda
Splash Lemon and/or Lime juice

Add cubed ice to a highball or double rocks glass. Add Advocaat, citrus, and top with lemon-lime soda. Stir carefully to mix. Garnish with lemon wheel.

——

I need to get some Advocaat, which is made from egg yolks, brandy, and vanilla. Heather used to call it “egg nog liqueur,” which isn’t that far from the truth. I’m guessing it will be a dandy base for any number of creamy Christmas bevvies. I’m guessing Ginger snaps, Egg Nog variations, nutty drinks, &c. There is a Mexican cousin of Advocaat that goes by the name of Rompope.

Making Spirits Bright

October 1st, 2007 by Colonel Tiki

Last year for Christmas, I made a new drink named “The Pomander,” whose scents I associate with Yuletide. This year, Blair and I decided to construct a selection of Christmas cocktails to provide to our thirsty friends.

To this aim, I’ve plan to:

  • Brainstorm flavours and scents reminiscent of Yule, Christmas, Winter &c.
  • Collect and document Seasonal cocktails for testing and analysis
  • Stick it all here in TD&IF.

So while it may be quite early for Xmas, I’m starting early so we can have some amazing tipples to tease your taste buds.

And don’t worry, Hallowe’en lovers – I’ve drinks in store for you as well. I’ve just published my first one for the Autumn: My version of the Apple Bang!