Glisan Grog

August 4th, 2011 by Colonel Tiki

I was lucky enough to be asked to provide a local-flavor exotic cocktail recipe to celebrate the triumphant return of Trader Vic’s to Portland. When I say triumphant, it is an understatement. The partners who realized this vision deserve the heaps of admiration they are currently receiving.

I did not expect to speak to a partner who clearly understood and had great experience with what Trader Vics is.  To be of the highest praise: This is Trader Vic’s.

And so, how could I not make a coffee grog? I’ve been waxing about the deep body of coffee for some time now and will likely continue. The dandy combination of Coffee/Lime/Pineapple forms the core of the flavor profile. One may be surprised at the volume of Herbsaint – it should balance the fresh pineapple and the wine notes of a central american sourced coffee, so feel free to tweak at will.

Glisan Grog

2 oz dark Jamaican Rum1
¾ oz cold coffee2
¾ oz fresh pineapple juice3
½ oz B. G. Reynolds Vanilla Syrup
½ oz fresh lime juice
¼ oz Herbsaint4
2 dashes bitters

Shake all with 6 oz crushed ice5. Pour into a double rocks glass and garnish with spanked mint and a dusting of ground nutmeg.

  1. a mix of dark and aged Jamaican is also interesting []
  2. central american source []
  3. traditional variety, non-’gold’ []
  4. or less as to your taste and balance []
  5. for a better drink, use a top-down mixer []

The Cutting of the Grapefruit

May 4th, 2011 by Colonel Tiki

It’s no secret I adore grapefruit. I’ve even been caught, in public, saying quite embarrassing things about the depths of my love. It’s a love that cuts deep. Today I’ll show you just how deep you should cut and prepare your fruit.

I apologize, dear reader. We are at the very tail end of a glorious white grapefruit1 season, so you very likely won’t be able to get your hands on such a glorious globe as the one pictured here. Fear not! The prep advice offered below is even more appropriate when used on inferior yet widely available red varietals.

The Center Cannot Hold

The center of citrus fruit is roughly analogous to the umbilical cord; it is the highway for nourishment to reach the segments. This marvelous cell structure is responsible for the delicious contents of the fruit, yet it alone is horribly distasteful. The flavor is nearly only strong bitterness. It should be removed. It also imparts a bitter flavor outward into the fruit – the juice sacs adjacent should also be removed. You can see the area below in green on mouse-over:

How to Field-Strip a Grapefruit

So here’s how to do it:


1. Cut through the fruit at just below half, where the fruit bulges the most.


2. Cut each of these two pieces again in half, through the central column.


3. Cut these quarters in half again, carefully through the central column.


4. Here you can see the 1/8th of fruit with the column still attached.


5. Cut through the juice sacs and remove the bitter central column with adjacent sacs.


6. Each such prepared 1/8 of a normal-sized grapefruit should yield ¾oz of flavorful juice2.


And that’s how you do it! If in a hurry, only 4 cuts are needed to have a 1/8 segment, ready to juice. Grapefruit a la minute.

  1. and pomello/grapefruit []
  2. just enough for a Navy Grog! []

NYE 2009 – Tom & Jerry

December 31st, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?

Hope you had a great 2009. The Colonel will be back in 2010 to help you forget your pesky resolutions.

Cheers!

Hot Buttered Rum While Decorating

December 5th, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

Seemed like Hot Buttered Rum Time.

2 Tablespoons ColTiki Hot Buttered Rum batter
1½ oz Rum of choice((I put out Coruba, A Martinique, and the Scarlet Ibis))
4 oz Hot Water
Fresh Nutmeg, Mace

Mix batter with 2 oz almost boiling water until dissolved. Add rum and stir while adding the last 2 oz of water. Dust with fresh ground nutmeg and mace.

Things are a-brewing

July 31st, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

Greetings!

Here is a teaser of things to come:

Powdre Forte Tinctures

Monkey Hut Double Rocks Front

TDN – Bols Genever: G.V.D. (godverdomme)

June 8th, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

Sometime ’round about 2002 a friend of mine returned from Amsterdam with a ceramic bottle of Corenwyn. Since then, I’ve been completely enamored with Corenwyn, genevers, and old-tom gins. Blair over on the Mixoloseum Blog can tell you more about Genever and such, I’ll just say it is delicious.

This past Thursday’s TDN was centered around Bols new launch of their Genever. It is a fabulous product. Right now it has limited availability and I look forward its expansion (and support from the OLCC, I hope). It has a mouth feel of velvet and a refined balanced flavor profile that ends in warm malty notes.

The strange late spring heat wave we’ve been having here in Portland directed me toward my concoction that I delivered to TDN. My friends Molly and Zorn (both PDX bartenders with decades of experience) introduced me to the wonder of chile peppers and fruit in cocktails. Greg Hoitsma over at Andina also has great success with Habañero and Passion Fruit (an amazing combination). I am particularly obsessed with the pineapple/lemon/simple/chile, featuring a good earthy chile such as a Jalapeño or a Serrano. For a Thai chile or birds-eye I think I might switch out the lemon for lime.

I’m very happy with the result from the below concoction. It is amongst the four finalists over at the Mixoloseum Blog. Please go over there to vote for it if you find it surpasses the competition, as I do. Also if you’re over there try out the “Malt Gasoline.” It’s a wonderful swizzle only slightly less of a winner than mine. ;)

G.V.D. (godverdamme)

Photo courtesy Tiare (www.amountainofcrushedice.com)

G.V.D (godverdomme)
2 oz Bols Genever
½ oz pineapple juice (fresh, please)
½ oz lemon juice
½ oz vanilla syrup (sub simple)
few pinapple chunks
3 slices jalapeño or serrano chile
dash aromatic bitters (fee’s old fashioned, angostura, &c.)

Muddle pinapple chunks, chile, and juices. Add remaning ingredients and shake with ice to mix and form head. Double strain into cocktail glass and garnish with lemon twist (or as Tiare has in her beautiful shot, pineapple wedge and chile).

Mixology Monday May 2009: Amaro

May 18th, 2009 by Colonel Tiki

mxmologoIs it that time of the month again? Sakes alive, how time flies. Sebastian is just past 4 months old and Tiki Kon is only 2 months away.

This month the Internet’s favorite all-around superb stylish talented and popular fellow, Chuck Taggart hosts May’s Mixology Monday. He’s chosen Amaro for the theme.

Italian Amaros (Amari?) are bitter liqueurs meant to stimulate digestion or alleve indigestion if need be — digestive bitters. We’re all familiar with Campari and Fernet and likely some are familiar with Cynar which is made with artichokes. The Italians have dozens (if not near past 100) more. They are usually built on wines fortified with high-alcohol extractions of botanicals, spices, and bittering agents. Amaros are current loves of stateside bartenders who are reaching for something to suit the body of the cocktail more than the traditional shake of strong aromatic bitters for the nose of the drink.

I’ve loved every amaro I’ve tried withough fail, so I though it fitting to pair my cocktail with a liquor that I’ve been fighting to develop a taste for and until only recently failed: Tequila. Try as I might to find avenues and gateways into appreciating tequila (mescal, cachaça, etc.) it was no use. This was my bane – my last liquor to conquer and I had failed. That is, until recently. It just clicked into place – it finally made sense. Much to my relief I now have another color in my pallete and this is my first recipe using the toungue-timber of the hearts of blue agave. I hope you enjoy. I pair it with two of my favorite amaros: Cynar and Averna.

Amaro Amigo

Amaro Amigo

½ oz Cynar
½ oz Averna
¾ oz Tequila Ocho Plata (or other 100% blue agave blanco tequila)
½ oz blood orange juice
¼ oz lime juice
½ oz Cointreau
dash cinnamon tincture (or cinnamon heavy bitters)
dash herbsaint

Stir with ice in mixing glass and double strain into cocktail glass. Olé

Thanks to Chuck for hosting!

Gruß vom Krampus series, card II

December 3rd, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Ponder this – other than getting coal for Christmas1, Santa Claus just isn’t that scary. I know we all love to browse through the annual re-posting of the kids disturbed by the Jolly Old Elf, but he just doesn’t instill a palpable sense of dread2.

You’d better watch out, You’d better not cry
You’d better not pout, I’m telling you why:
Santa Claus is coming to town.

That’s really not much of a threat. I think this factor leads to my love for the dual nature of the European old (St.) Nick. The Devil coming to get you with his switch and horns and chains and claws? Yes, that the stuff. That should definitely inspire more nightmares than a lump of old coal.

Consider that nugget in the card below, where we get a close approximation to Coots’s and Gillespie’s lyrics above:

312985

Sei nur brav und niemals keck
Dann der Krampus schaut um’s eck

Be only well-behaved and never saucy,
(for) the Krampus is looking around the corner.

He sees you when you’re sleeping. He knows when you’re awake. Gruß vom Krampus!

And Yes, I know – another post with no cocktails. Hey, this is the “indigo firmaments” part of the blog and it has been ingored a bit as of late. I do promise that by the end of the week I’ll have a new cocktail for you all: The Krampus Swizzle. 5 points for the first person to get the connection.

  1. who gets coal anymore? anyone still use Christmas to punish misbehaving kids in contemporary culture? []
  2. other than the aspect of reduced gift volume []

The Rongo Bowl

September 7th, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

This year marks the 45th anniversary of Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room, which opened on June 23rd 1963. This was the first attraction to use audio-animatronics1. The Tiki room’s imagineering would become the seed that would later flower into the magic behind the Pirates of the Caribbean and The Haunted Mansion.

As a child (and still as an adult), I would spend most of my time in Adventureland and New Orleans Square; these locations drove my imagination more than any other aspect of the park. I often joke that Disneyland ruined me for my sense of decoration; I feel the over-fantastical theme and attention to detail to be the norm. You can see a basic example of this phenomenon the Monkey Hut and the Buccaneer’s Bathroom at the old house.2

Pele mugBut enough about that, we were talking tiki. For the 40th anniversary in 2003, artists Kevin Kidney and Jody Daily sculpted a number of mugs. You may remember Kevin from his “Miehana” mug (and accompanying beachbum recipe in “Grog Log”). I’m lucky enough to have a Pele mug from this run.

miehanaThe interesting thing is that one mug that was designed was not produced: The Rongo Bowl. Humuhumu wrote about this back in 2006. Well, lucky us. The 45th anniversary was another chance at a run of production and 500 Rongo Bowls were produced. On Monday, June 23 of this past June, Disneyland hosted a collectable event offering a grand selection of 45th anniversary merchandise. I was heartbroken that I could not make it down for the event. My good friend Brian did, however. He was unbelievably kind enough to get me a Rongo Bowl of my very own.

For this great occasion, I felt a new bowl drink creation was in order. This would be my first attempt at a bowl drink, which is very exciting. Since Rongo is the god of agriculture, I felt a strong fruit forward flavor was necessary, as well as a floral and fresh aroma. After three attempts I decided upon the recipe.3

Rongo
God of Agriculture
In Tropic Lands the Legends Tell
Astounding Pioneers Did Dwell
This Wise Fella Began All-Flight
For Rongo Flew the World’s First Kite!

This bowl is deviously deceptive – there are four ounces of 80-proof spirit within. To honor Rongo’s invention of the Kite, this Rongo Bowl will send you soaring!4
Rongo Bowl

Rongo Bowl
¾ oz orange blossom honey
¾ oz fresh lime juice
¾ oz fresh orange juice
¾ oz fresh white grapefruit juice
2 oz unsweetened pineapple juice
2 oz Dark Jamaican Rum (Coruba)
1 oz Demerara (Lemonhart 80)
1 oz Virgin Islands gold (Cruzan 2yr ‘dark’)
¼ oz orgeat
¼ oz passion fruit syrup
10 drops Herbsaint or other earthy absinthe (about 1/8th teaspoon)
3 dashes Fees Bros. old fashioned bitters

Heat honey to liquid and combine with all ingredients in mixing container. Fill Rongo bowl with crushed ice and pour into bowl. Stir with swizzle to cool and dilute. Garnish and serve.

Rongo Bowl Rongo Bowl Rongo Bowl Rongo Bowl

photo and photodesign credit: Heather ‘Tikimama’ Gregg

  1. Juan the “Barker Bird”, who was Jose’s cousin was originally outside, announcing the attraction. The crowds that would stand and watch him clogged the entry into Adventureland so he was removed []
  2. I feel these are now below what I wish to accomplish. Look soon for the plans, in-action shots, and creation stories for the new basement: “Colonel Tiki’s Cove” []
  3. Thanks to the help of Noel Henneman and the lovely Tikimama who were helpful in constructive criticism []
  4. Mary Poppins reference, “Let’s go Fly a Kite,” written by the Sherman Brothers who also wrote “The Tiki, Tiki, Tiki Room” as well as numerous other works of genius []

Desert Island Spirits Picks

August 22nd, 2008 by Colonel Tiki

Rick over at KaiserPenguin popped a fun little exercise up yesterday. We cocktail crazies have rows of bottles, but what if we only could have Ten? Only ten (magically refilling) bottles for the rest of our lives?

What Ten would you pick?

Here’s my Ten. May this limit never come to pass.

  • J Wray 17 year old Jamaican Rum
  • El Dorado 15 year old Demerara
  • Mount Gay Extra Old
  • Plymouth Gin
  • Rittenhouse 23 year old Rye
  • Lillet Blanc
  • Punt e Mes
  • Glenfiddich 21 year old Caribbean rum cask
  • Green Chartreuse VEP
  • Everclear (for making my own infusions and distillations)

Yes, that last one is kinda like asking for more wishes as the last wish. So what? I’m sneaky.